Things to do in Hong Kong

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Things to do in Hong Kong Hong Kong’s culture is a melting pot of customs and traditions, influenced by thousands of years of immigration. Wherever you look in the city, there is a story to be told that will take you back centuries: whether it’s in the traditional Chinese festivals, cultural arts, or family-run restaurants.

Visiting old walled villages and the Railway museum
In this lightning-paced cosmopolitan that is Hong Kong, it can be easy to overlook the city’s rural roots. Back before the city’s financial institutions dominated downtown, before industry reimagined the city, Hong Kong was a series of markets, of small communities subsisting on the land, living inside walled villages. If you travel up into the New Territories you’ll discover that traditional life still exists behind these walls. Below you’ll find an introduction to the oldest of Hong Kong’s architecture and an insight into this very distinct culture. You can also get out and about in Tai Po, to see how this ancient market town has evolved beyond the walls. And last but not least one can find the Hong Kong Railway museum here too.

Things to do in Hong Kong map

At the map below you’ll find an introduction to just some of Things to do in Hong Kong. This is not an extensive list. There are many more historical, beautiful or fun places to visit during your stay in Hong Kong. For reference I included Hong Kong International Airport at Lantau island.
Just zoom in at the map and click the markers for details explanations.

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Victoria Peak: 22.275883, 114.145532
The Peak Tram: 22.277685, 114.159209
Ngong Ping 360: 22.256316, 113.901416
Aberdeen Harbour: 22.246428, 114.150096
Stanley Market & Murray House: 22.218437, 114.211636
Repulse Bay Beach: 22.234504, 114.195204
Jumbo kingdom: 22.243554, 114.161831
Lan Kwai Fong: 22.280837, 114.155671
Causeway Bay + Ding Ding tram: 22.285979, 114.191492
Mongkok: 22.318563, 114.171038
Victoria Harbour - Symphone of lights: 22.292829, 114.172668
Star Ferry Pier - Kowloon: 22.293763, 114.168748
Star Ferry pier - Hong Kong Island: 22.287081, 114.161208
Nan Lian Garden: 22.339140, 114.204834
Chi Lin Nunnery: 22.340714, 114.205352
Ladies Market: 22.318980, 114.170642
Temple Street Night Market @ Yau Ma Tei: 22.307320, 114.170222
Tai O Fishing Village: 22.254039, 113.862460
Golden Bauhinia Square (and HKCEC): 22.284293, 114.173764
Wong Tai Sin temple: 22.343431, 114.193801
hollywood road: 22.283886, 114.151317
Lantau Island & Disneyland hong kong: 22.285920, 114.006500
Hong Kong Airport: 22.308047, 113.918481
Tai Po & Hong Kong Railway Museum: 22.447762, 114.164429
Cityplaza shopping (and new Starbucks): 22.285681, 114.217593
Cheung Chau island: 22.201618, 114.026501
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Hong Kong Airport
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The Peak Tram
The Peak Tram is very popular with tourists who want to see Victoria Peak or get a bird’s eye view of the city. It carries about 11,000 or 12,000 people a day or 4 million passengers a year up to the top of the peak. It was first built in 1888, and it feels antique.

It is quickest and most scenic way to climb the peak. As you travel the 1.4 kilometers, you can relax as you see the sights below. You can see a lot of Hong Kong Island, Victoria Harbor and Kowloon.

Peak Tram Travel Essentials
  • Fares: Adults 28 HKD one way (3.60 USD), 40 HKD return; children and seniors 11 HKD one way, 18 HKD return.
  • Hours: 7 am to midnight.
    Time needed: 5 minutes transport + about 20 minutes to 2 hours waiting in line. Lines are longest on Sundays and holidays in the late morning and lunch hours during good weather.
  • To avoid the ticket lines use an Octopus card or buy a ticket in advance.
  • Transport to lower terminus:
    From Central MTR station, Exit J or K and follow the signs (12 minute walk). From the Admiralty MTR station, Exit C1 and follow the signs (12 minute walk).
    From the Star Ferry in Central, take Bus 15C from the bus lot in front.
  • Distance: 1.4 kilometers.
  • Elevation: from 28 meters to 396 meters altitude (368 meters up).
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Aberdeen Harbour
If you intending lunching at Jumbo (see marker #J below) it would be logical to visit Aberdeen first then Repulse Bay (see marker #R below) then Stanley (see marker #S below).

Transportation
  • From Central you can take bus 70 (about every 10 mins) from Exchange Square Bus Station to Aberdeen and get off at Aberdeen Promenade for the free shuttle ferry to Jumbo. Journey takes about 30 mins.
  • From Aberdeen you can take bus 73 (every 20 mins or so) to Stanley via Repulse Bay and break your journey at Repulse Bay on the way. Note if you intend going to Stanley Market it's a day market and shops close at about 5-30 to 6pm Journey time from Aberdeen to Repulse Bay about 15 mins, Repuse Bay to Stanley about 20 mins.
  • Aberdeen, Repulse Bay and Stanley are also connected by frequent green minibus service 52 which is faster than service 70.
  • From Stanley to get back to Central take bus 6,6A,6X,66 or 260
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Golden Bauhinia Square (and HKCEC)
Bauhinia Square
The Bauhinia is the emblem of Hong Kong. The Forever Blooming Bauhinia Sculpture that gives the Expo Promenade the commonly used name, Golden Bauhinia Square, was a gift from the Central Government to mark the 1997 Handover — an occasion that held tremendous significance for the world’s largest nation and that stands out as a landmark event in 20th century history.

Today the site is hugely popular with Chinese visitors who come to take photos of the Reunification Monument, which bears inscriptions of the calligraphy of President Jiang Zemin who represented China at the Handover Ceremony and to enjoy the pomp and symbolism of the daily Flag-raising Ceremony with beautiful Victoria Harbour as a backdrop.

Event times
  • Daily Flag-raising Ceremony Every day except the first of each month: 7:50–8:03am
    This ceremony is performed by Hong Kong police officers in ceremonial uniform and includes the playing of the national anthem.
 The ceremony will be conducted by different uniformed youth groups on the second Sunday of each month.
  • Enhanced Flag-raising Ceremony On the first day of every month: 7:45–8:13am
    This ceremony includes a flag-raising party of Hong Kong police officers accompanied by a rifle unit, both wearing full uniform. The ceremony will include the playing of the national anthem by the Police Band followed by a 10-minute musical performance by the Police Pipe Band.
Please be aware that the flag-raising ceremony may be cancelled at any time due to bad weather conditions. In the case of a cancellation, an announcement will be made through local media channels between 7am and 8am.

Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC)
With its vast curtain of glass and 40,000-square-metre aluminium roof sculpted to echo a seabird soaring in flight, the striking Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre is a major landmark on the Hong Kong Island skyline. Known worldwide as HKCEC, this harbourfront expansion used top-down construction techniques to meet a challenge of limited land supply; its highly innovative methods winning many industry accolades.

While Jackie Chan fans may remember the building as the setting for the dramatic grand finale of New Police Story, it was also the backdrop for a spectacle of far more significance — the Handover Ceremony on 30 June 1997. This is when the former British Crown Colony was returned to the People's Republic of China and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region was established.
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Causeway Bay + Ding Ding tram
If shopping were a sport, Causeway Bay would be the home of the Olympic Games. This is where consumerism is out and proud, and every available square inch is seemingly devoted to worshipping at the altar of retail. Even though a relatively compact area, it would still take at least an entire day to work your way through its endless shopping malls, department stores, boutiques and market stalls.

Causeway Bay is a true microcosm of Hong Kong’s shopping scene, with up-market fashion to be found in Lee Gardens One & Two, Hysan Place, Lee Theatre, Times Square and Fashion Walk, mid-price and luxury goods in SOGO Department Store and wtc more, affordable youth fashion boutiques in the warren of shops that make up the Island Beverly Centre, and bargains galore at the chaotic Jardine’s Crescent street market. And, among all these, are yet even more shops specialising in everything from shoes to electronics, computers, skin care, snacks, home accessories and more — overwhelming doesn’t begin to describe it!

Hong Kong dances to the beat of international trade. In the neon blur, advertising deluge and unabashed consumerism of Causeway Bay you can feel the city’s pulse like nowhere else.
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Chi Lin Nunnery
Established in 1934 and renovated in Tang dynasty style (AD 618–907) in 1990, the Chi Lin Nunnery is a large temple complex of elegant wooden architecture, treasured Buddhist relics and soul-soothing lotus ponds. The complex also includes a series of temple halls, some of which contain gold, clay and wooden statues representing divinities such as the Sakyamuni Buddha and bodhisattvas.
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Cityplaza shopping (and new Starbucks)
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Cheung Chau island
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Star Ferry Pier - Kowloon
The charming Star Ferry boats have been faithfully carrying passengers from Hong Kong Island to Kowloon and back since 1888. While the two sides of Victoria Harbour are now connected by a world-class infrastructure system of road and rail tunnels, tens of millions of people still climb aboard the humble Star Ferry vessels each year. Many visitors take the ride for an up-close look at one of the world’s most photographed harbours, while locals have kept their affection for it because, even after a century, it’s still a highly reliable and efficient form of transport. National Geographic rates the Star Ferry crossing as one of 50 ‘places of a lifetime’.

How to get there
  • TST Star Ferry pier:
    MTR Tsim Sha Tsui Station, Exit L6. Walk to the Clock Tower along Salisbury Road.
    Central Star Ferry pier: MTR Hong Kong Station, Exit A2 or MTR Central Station, Exit A. Walk to the pier along Man Yiu Street.
  • Wan Chai Star Ferry pier:
    MTR Wan Chai Station, Exit A1. Take the skybridge to the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, and descend to Convention Avenue at Harbour Road.
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Star Ferry pier - Hong Kong Island
The charming Star Ferry boats have been faithfully carrying passengers from Hong Kong Island to Kowloon and back since 1888. While the two sides of Victoria Harbour are now connected by a world-class infrastructure system of road and rail tunnels, tens of millions of people still climb aboard the humble Star Ferry vessels each year. Many visitors take the ride for an up-close look at one of the world’s most photographed harbours, while locals have kept their affection for it because, even after a century, it’s still a highly reliable and efficient form of transport. National Geographic rates the Star Ferry crossing as one of 50 ‘places of a lifetime’.

How to get there
  • TST Star Ferry pier:
    MTR Tsim Sha Tsui Station, Exit L6. Walk to the Clock Tower along Salisbury Road.
  • Central Star Ferry pier:
    MTR Hong Kong Station, Exit A2 or MTR Central Station, Exit A. Walk to the pier along Man Yiu Street.
  • Wan Chai Star Ferry pier:
    MTR Wan Chai Station, Exit A1. Take the skybridge to the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, and descend to Convention Avenue at Harbour Road.
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Nan Lian Garden
Nan Lian Garden
Cutting through Diamond Hill’s myriad of high-rise apartments is the tranquil Nan Lian Garden, a public park also built in the style of the Tang dynasty. Its scenic garden is meticulously landscaped over an area of 3.5 hectares, in which every hill, rock, body of water, plant and timber structure has been placed according to specific rules and methods. There are permenant exhibitions of Chinese timber architecture, rocks and potted plants, while the hungry might want to try the vegetarian restaurant or teahouse.
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Victoria Harbour - Symphone of lights
A Symphony of Lights Dinner Cruise
If you witness nothing else during your stay, a cruise around Hong Kong’s beautiful harbour at night would more than justify your journey. On a tour that includes a sumptuous buffet dinner and a live band, discover a wonderland of dancing lights as buildings come alive in the awe-inspiring multimedia show A Symphony of Lights.

A Symphony of Lights Harbour Cruise (by Watertours of Hong Kong Ltd.)
Set sail around the world’s most spectacular harbour and discover a new world of dancing lights set to music in the dramatic show that has been named the world's largest permanent light and sound show by Guinness World Records. Apart from the natural splendour of internal lighting, a number of buildings are embellished with computer-controlled neon lights with changing patterns according to the soundtrack and the season. And during Christmas and Chinese New Year, these imposing waterfront towers compete for attention with fantastic animated decorations covering their entire frontages.

A Symphony of Lights Harbour Cruise (by Star Ferry's Harbour Tour)
Step aboard the double-decker ‘Shining Star’ ferry for the best position possible to witness the most spectacular harbour and multimedia show in the world. Buildings in Tsim Sha Tsui combine with those on Hong Kong Island to present a stunning visual experience that is best viewed from the harbour itself. At the stroke of 8pm these 44 buildings erupt in coloured lights, laser beams and searchlights to perform a synchronised 13-minute display set to music and commentary.
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hollywood road
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Lantau Island & Disneyland hong kong
Lantau is the largest of Hong Kong’s islands and is almost double the size of Hong Kong Island itself. It is located 10km west of Hong Kong Island and is about 25km in length. Since 1997 when the Lantau Link was completed to serve Hong Kong International Airport on the flattened island of Chek Lap Kok, it has been connected to Kowloon and the New Territories by a series of bridges, roads and railway. Although considerable development has taken place along a narrow strip of the northern side of the island around the route of the Lantau Link with the construction of Hong Kong Disneyland, the private residential development of Discovery Bay and Tung Chung New Town, most of the island remains largely rural and unspoiled. The island is dominated by dramatic hills and peaks and spectacular scenery, picturesque coastline with some excellent beaches, temples, monasteries, traditional fishing villages and wonderful hiking trails. The population of Lantau is just over 105,000 (2011 census) but almost 85% of this is concentrated in the newly developed and fast growing towns of Tung Chung and Discovery Bay in North Lantau.
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Jumbo kingdom
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Lan Kwai Fong
The night is always young at Lan Kwai Fong, a buzzing centre of clubs, bars and restaurants.
It is a must for party goers & people watchers to visit this Western-style restaurants, nightclubs, delicatessens and bars.

How to get there
  • MTR Central Station Exit D2.
    Walk along Theatre Lane and uphill to D’Aguilar Street.
    About 5 minutes walk to Lan Kwai Fong.
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Mongkok
Mong Kok is Hong Kong’s most congested shopping and residential district, but don’t let that scare you away.
The neon-bathed historic streets that wind through one of the densest parts of the world are worth visiting - just for the ‘peoplescapes’ alone. It just so happens that the shopping is excellent too.

The neighbourhood includes one of Hong Kong’s most popular markets, the Ladies' Market, and also has a ton of shopping streets, which are a common feature in southern China. Conveniently, these are where a cluster of merchants sell one type of product on a single street. Mong Kok has entire streets and street sections dedicated to the sale of goldfish, flowers, birds, sneakers, and kitchenware.

Just about everything from bargain household objects to luxury jewellery is bought, sold and haggled over in Mong Kok. Sai Yeung Choi Street sells electronics, cosmetics and clothes; Shantung Street and Dundas Street are where you can pick up the latest Japanese and Western fashion and accessories; while Langham Place is one of the many malls where you can do your Mong Kok shopping in air-conditioned comfort.
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Ngong Ping 360
Preserving the natural ecological environment and features of the Ngong Ping area and converging the custom and culture of the Lantau Island.

Ngong Ping 360 is sure to refresh your body and enlighten your mind, as soon as you step on the Cable Car.

Ngong Ping Village is set on a 1.5 hectare site on Lantau Island, adjacent to Ngong Ping Cable Car Terminal and the Tian Tan Buddha Statue.

Looking up to the southwest from Tei Tan square in the middle of the Po Lin Monastery plaza, you will see a flight of 268 steps leading to the world’s largest outdoor bronze statue – the Giant Buddha.
np360.com.hk
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Tai O Fishing Village
Tai O is home to the Tanka people, a community of fisher folk who’ve built their houses on stilts above the tidal flats of Lantau Island for generations. These unusual structures are interconnected, forming a tightly-knit community that literally lives on the water. Their enchanting world is a photographer's paradise. A new manually operated drawbridge spans the narrow creek that divides the town, replacing an old-fashioned rope-drawn ‘ferry’ that operated for over 85 years.

How to get there
  • MTR Tung Chung Station. Take bus 11 to Tai O bus terminus (the journey takes approximately 50 minutes). Walk for around five minutes to the Rope-drawn Ferry Bridge and then take a stroll along the waterfront.
  • MTR Tung Chung Station Exit B. Take Ngong Ping cable car to Ngong Ping Village (approx 25 minutes). Take bus 21 to Tai O terminus (approx 20 minutes) and walk for around five minutes to the Rope-drawn Ferry Bridge and then take a stroll along the waterfront.
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Victoria Peak
Perching on The Peak at 396 metres above sea level, The Peak Tower is one of the most stylish architectural Hong Kong attractions. Inside The Peak Tower, there is a dazzling array of restaurants, shops and entertainment venues set against the beautiful backdrop of the city. Moreover, The Peak Tower boasts the highest 360° viewing platform – The Sky Terrace which offers spectacular panoramic views of the vibrant city.

How to get there
  • By Foot – From MTR Central Station
    Take the MTR to Central and make your way to the J2 exit of the Central MTR station.Turn right, through Chater Garden, cross Queen’s Road Central and make your way up Garden Road. You will pass the Bank of China Tower and Citibank Plaza on your left and St John’s Cathedral on your right before arriving at the terminus, which is to your left.
  • By Bus to Garden Road Peak Tram Lower Terminus
    Board the Peak Tram shuttle bus No. 15C at the Central(Near Star Ferry Pier 7) Bus Terminus.
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Repulse Bay Beach
Primarily an upmarket residential area, sun-drenched Repulse Bay has a relaxed resort-like feel to it. Its wide, wave-lapped beach is popular with both locals and visitors and is great for strolls in the early morning, daytime sun soaking when the bathers are out in force, or lingering at sunset when all has turned mellow.

This crescent-shaped stretch of sand is one of the most beautiful beaches in Hong Kong. It is also home to the Hong Kong Life Saving Society clubhouse, which is built in traditional Chinese style, with a ceiling decorated with magnificent swirling dragons. Towering twin statues of the deities Kwun Yam and Tin Hau dominate the picturesque gardens that lead down to the beach.

The nearby colonial-style building, The Repulse Bay houses designer shops and award-winning restaurants, and resembles the luxury hotel built in 1920 that originally occupied the site. Most of its grounds were redeveloped into luxury apartments more than 20 years ago, and only the original arcade remains.

How to get there
  • Bus 6, 6A, 6X, 66 or 260 from Exchange Square bus terminus (near MTR Hong Kong Station, Exit D) and alight at Repulse Bay Beach.
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Stanley Market & Murray House
Stanly Market and Murray House are within walking distance around a small bay. Among the more interesting sites in the fishing village of Stanley is this Murray House, a 160-year-old restored three-storey colonial building that was dismantled in 1982 and transplanted from its original site in Central to be rebuilt on the Stanley waterfront. The picturesque village on the south side of Hong Kong Island is gaining a reputation as a gourmet hot spot and foodies are drawn to the restaurants on the first floor of Murray House, some of which have great sea views.

How to get there
  • MTR Hong Kong Station, Exit D. Then take Bus 6, 6A, 6X, 66 or 260 from Central Exchange Square bus terminus.
  • MTR Causeway Bay Station, Exit F1. Walk to Jardine‘s Bazaar and then take minibus 40.
    Bus 973 from Canton Road outside the Silvercord Centre
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Tai Po & Hong Kong Railway Museum
Located in the northeasterly New Territories, the historic market town of Tai Po is the name of one of Hong Kong’s largest districts, with a population that’s divided between the relatively new town and the area’s 80-plus remote villages. Although Tai Po is now a buzzing modern suburbia, its roots lie with these ancient—and oft crumbling—walled villages: inside you’ll find families who’ve lived here for generations who can give you an insight into the district of old.

Hong Kong Railway Museum
Train enthusiasts can imagine arriving into Hong Kong by rail in the golden age of train travel at this charming little museum located in Tai Po Market. The Hong Kong Railway Museum is housed in the former Tai Po Railway Station, which was built using traditional Chinese architectural design in 1913 and is now preserved as a Declared Monument.

The permanent exhibition of Hong Kong's rail history includes photographs, old coaches, samples of tracks, and a full-size model of an electric train compartment. Feel free to climb aboard!

How to get there
  • By MTR:
    A 10-minute walk from Exit A2 of Tai Po Market Station to Tai Po Complex, follow the directional signage of the Museum and then through Wai Yi Street to On Fu Road by a 8-minute walk.
    A 10-minute walk from Exit B of Tai Wo Station. First, turn right to take escalator to Tai Wo Plaza. Next, follow the passage on the right to take escalator to the ground level. Then go in the direction of Oi Wo House and Kui Wo House, and follow the directional signage's of the Museum via Tai Wo Bridge and Yan Hing Street.
  • By Mini Bus:
    Interchange Mini Bus no. 20A, 20C, 20K at mini bus station next to MTR Tai Po Market Station, alight at Tai Po Complex and then through Wai Yi Street to On Fu Road by a 8-minute walk.
  • By Bus:
    KMB Bus nos. 72, 72X, 73X, 74X, 75X, 271, alight at Kwong Fuk Road and then a 15-minute walk along On Fu Road.
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Ladies Market
With over 100 stalls of bargain clothing, accessories and souvenirs, the Ladies’ Market on Tung Choi Street provides a one-kilometre stretch on which to practise your haggling skills. It gets its name from the huge amount of clothing and accessories on sale for women of all ages; however, with watches, cosmetics, bags, home furnishings, CDs and trinkets also up for grabs, you don’t need to be just in the market for a pair of nylon stockings to find something within its crowded aisles.

How to get there
  • MTR Mong Kok Station, Exit E2. Walk along Nelson Street for two blocks; or,
    take bus 1, 1A, 2, 6 or 9 from Tsim Sha Tsui Star Ferry Pier and get off at Nelson Street
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Wong Tai Sin temple
The Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple’s claim to ‘make every wish come true upon request’ might have something to do with its popularity. Home to three religions (Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism), its natural setting and beautifully ornamented buildings make it as much a scenic attraction as an important religious centre.

The temple commemorates the famous monk of yore, Wong Tai Sin (also known as Huang Chu-ping), who was born in the Fourth century and became a deity at Heng Shan (Red Pine Hill). In 1915, Taoist priest Liang Ren-an carried a sacred portrait of Wong Tai Sin from Guangdong in southern China to Hong Kong. Now housing this precious portrait, the Wong Tai Sin Temple is where worshippers pray for good fortune through offerings, divine guidance and fortune telling.

Feng shui enthusiasts may notice structures representing the five geomantic elements: the Bronze Pavilion (metal); the Archives Hall (wood); the Yuk Yik Fountain (water); the Yue Heung Shrine (fire), where the Buddha of the Lighting Lamp is worshipped; and the Earth Wall (earth). Other areas of the complex include the Three Saints Hall, the Confucian Hall and the extravagantly colourful Good Wish Garden that is lavishly decorated with chinoiserie.
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Temple Street Night Market @ Yau Ma Tei
When the sun goes down, the traders have already laid out their wares and the opera singers and fortune tellers begin to emerge. Welcome to the Temple Street Night Market, a popular street bazaar, named after a Tin Hau temple located in the centre of its main drag, and a place so steeped in local atmosphere that it has served as the backdrop to many a memorable movie.

Trinkets, tea ware, electronics, watches, menswear, jade and antiques are scrutinised and haggled over, while claypot rice, seafood, noodles and other treats are consumed with gusto.

Temple Street Night Market is an enduring example of the theatre and festivity of a Chinese market. And it’s on show nightly.

How to get there
  • MTR Yau Ma Tei Station, Exit C, turn onto Temple Street at Man Ming Lane; or,
  • MTR Jordan Station, Exit A. Turn right onto Jordan Road and then take another right onto Temple Street.
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About Author

Travel Photographer, Writer/blogger & Planner for Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan & other Asian countries. Since 2001 he visited a number of Asian countries like Mongolia, China, South Korea, Japan, Tibet and Nepal. There he enjoyed centuries of history and culture, local habits and beautiful locations. By this website www.myAsiaTravelguide.com he shares his experiences about these trips for a number of Asian countries to inspire other travelers.

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